Nissan XTerra Forum banner

41 - 51 of 51 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Yes' my first sentence should be understood well "SINGLE"

Belts are designed to go as long as a "single row chain" will if driven correctly.
Hope thats written better.
Todays chains are "double row" and most will last "the life of the engine" Unlike the single rows of yester year. For whatever that length of time is.
I think them saying the "chain last the life of the engines" is correct as when it lets go your engines life ends as well".....either at 95k or 300k....they are correct saying this.



"The solution of course is to buy one of them newfangled 2005+ X's."

Not always works out either. Since theres this one can look forward to by doing that:...lol

http://nissantimingchainlawsuit.com/


(BTW - the reference to you reading old posts was a compliment, as compared to newbs who ask questions WITHOUT reading up first. I think you might have thought I meant it differently?)

Sorry TJTJ
I did misunderstood u..I know what u mean now...I read too much though, all part of get'n old.
Hope that Rodeo runs better now first one I saw do that, aint love just grand...lol :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,779 Posts
Any updates here?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I am getting ready to change the timing belt on my 01 X. I was going to have a shop do it but after talking to some shops, and hearing the price they charge, I figure I'll find some time to do it my self. In any case one shop said they recommend changing the 01 X timing belt every 90k miles- the mechanic says he has seen some break prior to the 105k as listed in the X manual.

I have a BMW with interference engine (88 325e) and change that belt myself, but I have heard some BMW mechanics say the belt should be changed every 4 years regardless of the miles if the car is located here in Hawaii. The life of a timing belt not only depends on miles, but the climate and conditions the vehicle is driven. A lot of stop and go driving with the AC running in a hot climate will shorten the belts life significantly. I would think very cold weather would also shorten the belts life significantly- just think how brittle the belt would be at -50 deg F.

I have had the belt on my Mitsubishi pickup break 2x while driving- just changed the belt and no engine damage- I like them clearence engines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
BTW, when I replace my 01 X timing belt I want to replace any coolant hoses that are hard to get to. I have the drawing from Courtesy Nissan but hard to tell what hoses are the hard to get to ones. Could someone provide the part numbers?
Thanks
 

·
Sage Mentor/Moderator
Joined
·
12,216 Posts
BTW, when I replace my 01 X timing belt I want to replace any coolant hoses that are hard to get to. I have the drawing from Courtesy Nissan but hard to tell what hoses are the hard to get to ones. Could someone provide the part numbers?
Thanks
Why not just do them all and call it a day? That way, you know the dates on all of them.

:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I am a total nob and I replaced my timing belt after it broke and everything is fine. Did all the work myself in about 6 hours. 80% of people I know with Xterras dont get any valve damage. Funny thing is I was on the way home with a new Gates timing belt when my belt broke. I bought the X with 165K miles and didnt know if the previous owner changed it so I wanted to. I was less than one mile from being home when mine broke.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I just want to share a hope full story to all who has read this thread trying to figure out what happened to their xterra / figuring out how to fix it.
I just recently got married and my wife has a 2002 xterra 4x4 with 307,000 miles. She was driving to work one day and said she heard a “pop” while she was driving (about 30 mph) and the car wouldn’t accelerate anymore but the engine was still running so she pulled over and I picked her up and she told me what all had happened. We had the car towed to a mechanic who told us it was the timing belt and it would be about $517 to fix with a 50/50 shot the engine would need replacing even after the timing replacement. So I decided I would fix it. We got the car back a day or two later and after I had read some forums on this website I dove into it. Won’t get into the nitty gritty details because there are some good reference here and on YouTube on how to replace it but I got it replaced and put the engine bay back together and she fired right up! No ticking or anything.
One thing I forgot to mention. After the mechanic told me it was the timing belt I asked her father when the last time it had been replaced ( he bought it new in 2001) and he said it has NEVER been replaced. Our xterra has been a great car and highly recommend them to anyone who is thinking about getting one.

Lives to die another day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
951 Posts
Sorry to hear about your trouble.

The OEM belts are manufactured by Gates. Per Gates instructions they should be replaced every 105k miles or 5 years, which ever comes first. These are rubber parts and they do degrade and break down over time, whether the vehicle is driven or not).

That said, I've gotten in the habit of either buying vehicles with a timing chain (which doesn't typically need changing) or I replace the timing belt when I buy a used vehicle, regardless of how many miles. I do do my own work, so replacing the belt and pump is about a $130 job, plus my time, but back before I knew how to do the work I would always have it done by a mechanic and just planned on it.

Always factor in the cost of a new timing belt into your vehicle budget.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
When I used to work on BMWs, they had timing chains that were replaceable in less than an hour, if you were smart. Car would come in sounding like a typewriter convention. We pull the valve cover and position the engine at TDC. Remove a link from the timing chain and attach the new timing chain with a master link to the old chain. Then we slowly turn the crankshaft, with a ratchet, through two revolutions. The new chain walks in, as the old chain comes out. Complete the circle of the new chain by installing the master link. You're done! This, of course, is only possible if you don't have a ratcheting tensioner (like the in-line 6 cylinders the Datsun 240z had) that compensates for the chain stretch and is not accessible without removing the engine front timing cover.
I was hard to convince me a timing belt made good sense, but I've seen the light, now. They are lighter, so they save fuel. Quieter. Cheaper. And, if the engine is sensibly oriented in the engine compartment, as in front-to-back, the job is not that hard or time consuming. A scheduled maintenance, to let the observant mechanic see what else might need attention, is a plus for both the owner and the mechanic. We would often sell a valve adjustment and spark plug replacement, to make it run strong, at the same time to soften the pain of replacing something that wasn't broken.
 
41 - 51 of 51 Posts
Top