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Good afternoon everyone.

Just finished processing all of the photos I took at Grand Canyon last Tuesday.
The ones I am sharing are surplus photos that I don’t need for my work.
My best photos will be going up for sale.

As I mentioned in the prior message I was experimenting with the Fisheye lens I got about 2 weeks ago.
Unlike other lenses I have used, photos taken with this Fisheye Lens are very sharp.
At an F-stop setting of F11 the image is very sharp almost to the edge of the image.

These next 3 photos show a storm moving into Grand Canyon.
The 3rd photo shows a lightning strike on the North Rim that I captured.

Any questions feel free to reply.
Those are some great pictures for sure. What lens and camera did you use for those shots? Are you a Nikon, Sony or Canon user or some of each maybe?
 

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As I mentioned in the posting I used a Fisheye Lens.
The photos I posted were corrected during post editing because a Fisheye produces an extreme curvature.
To be specific it was the 16mm Nikon Fisheye.
I've been using Nikon since 2010.
I started off with a Nikon D2Xs.
In 2018 I upgraded to a D810.

The Fisheye is normally a $1000 lens, but I traded in two older lenses that I didn't use much anymore and used the credit to get the Fisheye, as well as a 50mm F1.4G, and a Sigma 120-400mm lens.

Here is a link to it to the fisheye specifications.
I currently have the Nikon D3100 camera that is far more basic I believe than your D810. I use a AF-S Nikkor 28-55mm lens with a Hoya 52mm PL-CIR filter. The lens gives me a fairly nice range of field for home photos with great picture quality results. To my eye anyway.
 

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The quality of the sensor is more important than the buttons and whiz-bang gadgets. If you shoot in RAW (Nikon = NEF, Canon = CR2, etc.) then only the White Balance and possibly a very small number of other settings will affect the data in the file, aka the "negative".

The D810 has a full-frame sensor and your D3100 has a cropped sensor. Full-frame (aka FX) just means that its sensor compares in size to a standard 35mm film negative, which is approximately 35mm x 24mm. The cropped sensor (aka DX) is approximately 24mm x 16mm. That comes to a crop factor of 1.5 on each side, so the FX has an area that is 2.25 times larger. (For the math-challenged, that's 1.5 x 1.5, or 1.5 squared.)

If you need large "photo buckets" (aka photon capture sites) then FX is your better choice. If you need higher resolution, then DX will get more pixels on the subject.

Both of my Nikon bodies are DX and I use almost exclusively FX lenses. Some say that I'm paying too much for good glass and then throwing away the outer portions. I say that I'm paying for good glass and using the best part it has to offer, while not even recording the edges where all lenses struggle to do well.
I would say you are making the proper choice when it comes to "good glass".
 

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Sorry for the late reply. I was at Grand Canyon all day.
The D810 is considered a semi-pro camera body, meaning that it can be used professionally as well as by serious hobbyists.
Pro-cameras are physically larger and have a metal frame so that they are more resistant to being dropped on the ground by accident. They are also much heavier.
But the pro-camera sensors and image capture capability are the same as the semi-pro cameras.
Since I am limited on how much weight I can carry in my backpack I chose the D810.
The D810 has the same capabilities as the professional D5, but it is smaller and lighter in weight.
The D810 has a 36 megapixel sensor, which I need for making large prints.

But in truth, it is not the camera body that determines the quality of the images, it's the lenses.
That's why I invested more in professional lenses.
To use an analogy, the camera body is like a tool box, but the lenses are the tools inside the box.

You never did say what the F-stop was for your lenses.
The lower the F-stop number on the lens the more light it can gather for the shutter speed setting.
All but two of my lenses are F2.8 which is the minimum you want for professional use.
One of my lenses is F1.4 which is extremely fast.
If yours is around F3.5 to F4 then you have the basic consumer grade lenses.
They are good for general purpose, which is probably okay for you.
But if you get into professional work you will need F2.8 minimum.
I don't see an F number printed on the lens itself. While taking a second look at it I find that I quoted the wrong range spec for the lens. It's actually a 18-55mm lens. Maybe if I look up the lens online it will tell me a F #.
 

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I don't see an F number printed on the lens itself. While taking a second look at it I find that I quoted the wrong range spec for the lens. It's actually a 18-55mm lens. Maybe if I look up the lens online it will tell me a F #.
Learning as I go here. I guess the numbers following the "18-55mm" on the lens are the F range without printing the F. "1:3.5-5.6 G" is labeled. I have a yellow rear bumper sticker designating "Rookie" status in this discussion.
 

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Yes, that is a basic consumer grade lens.
It is adequate for hobbyists and people just starting out and need something to learn on.
When I first got into photography back in 2003 I started off with an Olympus DSLR. Its lens was also an F3.5
I used it for some photos that are still up for sale on Adobe Stock.
Here is an old lightning photo I took with it back in 2006 with the Olympus.
This has the Adobe watermarks on it since it is still up for sale on their site and continues to make me money even to this day.
However, as the photography agencies began to require higher resolutions and more detail I had to upgrade to Nikon in 2010.
Well, if you are able to make money with lightning shots, you would do well to live or visit here in central Florida where we have lightning shows near every day for weeks on end. Rain and thunder storms have a especially violent nature here in Florida. If you have ever experienced it here you would know what I am talking about.
 

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I haven't been to Florida since I was a kid.
If gas was not so high I might make a trip there one day.
I do know that Florida is high on the list when it comes to the amount of lightning, but Arizona also has a lot of lightning.
We have the summer monsoon storms that can be quiet spectacular.
During a photo trip to Grand Canyon a few weeks ago I was caught in a lightning storm while hiking.
The strikes were coming down within a few hundred feet of my location. I would see the flash and hear the bang just a fraction of a second later. I could even smell ozone and burned wood in the air since I was in the forest at the time. I actually captured a few of the strikes in the canyon before the rain started pouring down on me.
Here's a link to one of the strikes I caught before the storm reached my location.
By the way, my lightning photos are my best sellers.

I did some checking and Texas actually has the most ground to cloud lightning strikes, but Florida was listed as the most lightning fatalities.
The flash-bang interval is exactly how we rate our lightning close calls here. And then there is the destroyed home electronics that get toasted when the lightning travels from the tree through the roots across the wet ground to the house ground rod and into the house. Ground fault is a must!
 

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You can actually measure the distance by the thunder delay.
As you might know, sound travels at roughly 1000 feet per second.
A mile is exactly 5283 feet.
So if you see a flash and count 5 seconds before hearing the thunder then the bolt was almost a mile away.
With the bang sounding with only a fraction of a second delay meant they were coming down within within 500 feet of my location.
A couple of times I actually felt a sort of static zap in my hands. That meant it was dangerously close. But there was nothing I could do about it and I was still a half-mile from my Xterra, so I kept moving until I reached my vehicle. When I reached my Xterra I had to sit in it for almost an hour until the storm finally dissipated.

On the matter of ground fault interrupters, my house has lightning arrestors built into the breaker box. They're suppose to prevent a lightning surge from getting into the house circuits if a bolt strikes our Well Pump or the main power line that leads to our meter.
Yes, my main electrical entrance has a lightning arrestor installed by the power company but in the end, lightning will do whatever it wants and find a way to do it. The lightning hits the tree and kills you because you are in near contact with its roots. You would be lucky to have all your parts in the end.
 
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