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Discussion Starter #101
One bad apple doesn't mean the oranges are no good.

There are shops and/or mechanics that are worth their weight in gold. You've just found one that uses sand instead. Don't sell all shops down the river over the actions of one, but beware no matter what! Being informed increases your chances of getting a proper repair.

If you can prove to them that their work was subpar, make them fix it and this time, take a chair right next to it and observe every move without interfering. If they're not comfy with that, they're incompetent to start with and don't deserve to be working on your rig, or anyone else's for that matter.
This is NOT the 1st time I've been screwed over at a shop, trust me I've been around a while. Im sick of the dance you have to do to prove your not a stupid uninformed female when it comes to these situations. Anyway, this is a "repair" forum so ...
 
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This is NOT the 1st time I've been screwed over at a shop, trust me I've been around a while. Im sick of the dance you have to do to prove your not a stupid uninformed female when it comes to these situations. Anyway, this is a "repair" forum so ...
There is no doubting what you are saying here. The practice of female customer "targeting" is certainly still evident today. If and when you are able to find that mechanic that is fair, talented and respectful....you will be hanging on to them for dear life.
 

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It's a tough one. It depends on whether the leak is coming from the new water pump or from the hoses under the intake manifold. I assume that they didn't remove the intake manifold when they did the timing belt and water pump. In theory they should have recognized that there was coolant leaking from above the water pump, but if they had, they still would have charged you the $500 extra to take the intake manifold off and fix the leak. If you do find a competent and fair mechanic, keep him, share him with your friends, and never let him go. LOL

You seem to be relatively handy, so I'd consider removing the intake manifold and inspecting all of the hoses and pipes yourself. It's not too terrible of a job and there are a bunch of threads on it here. The hardest part is dealing with the two coolant lines that come up behind the intake. A lot of guys just cut them and replace them. If the OEM spring style hose clamps are in good shape I recommend re-using them (as per my earlier post). If you do that you may want to replace the valve cover gaskets while you are in there.
 

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View attachment 76461
OK, armed with ALL the info I have gotten from y'all, this truck WILL be fixed today! One way or another 🤞🏻🤞🏻🤞🏻

.....or not 😫😫😫
View attachment 76462 View attachment 76463 View attachment 76464 View attachment 76465 View attachment 76466 View attachment 76467
After taking a 2nd detailed look at the picture of the bottom of that power steering pump I see that the hard line metal pipe that bolts to the bottom of the pump has a rubber hose connected by a hose clamp not too far above the bottom of the pump. I am wondering if you can tell if the "wet" starts there at the rubber hose connection or is it coming from above that hose connection? Looks crowded in there but I would test the tightness of that hose connection also. Also looks like there are two fluids there, a clear power steering fluid and a green coolant or A/C refrigerant fluid.
 

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2004 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (160k miles) & 2003 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (dead engine)
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Discussion Starter #105 (Edited)
There is no doubting what you are saying here. The practice of female customer "targeting" is certainly still evident today. If and when you are able to find that mechanic that is fair, talented and respectful....you will be hanging on to them for dear life.
It's a tough one. It depends on whether the leak is coming from the new water pump or from the hoses under the intake manifold. I assume that they didn't remove the intake manifold when they did the timing belt and water pump. In theory they should have recognized that there was coolant leaking from above the water pump, but if they had, they still would have charged you the $500 extra to take the intake manifold off and fix the leak. If you do find a competent and fair mechanic, keep him, share him with your friends, and never let him go. LOL

You seem to be relatively handy, so I'd consider removing the intake manifold and inspecting all of the hoses and pipes yourself. It's not too terrible of a job and there are a bunch of threads on it here. The hardest part is dealing with the two coolant lines that come up behind the intake. A lot of guys just cut them and replace them. If the OEM spring style hose clamps are in good shape I recommend re-using them (as per my earlier post). If you do that you may want to replace the valve cover gaskets while you are in there.
After taking a 2nd detailed look at the picture of the bottom of that power steering pump I see that the hard line metal pipe that bolts to the bottom of the pump has a rubber hose connected by a hose clamp not too far above the bottom of the pump. I am wondering if you can tell if the "wet" starts there at the rubber hose connection or is it coming from above that hose connection? Looks crowded in there but I would test the tightness of that hose connection also. Also looks like there are two fluids there, a clear power steering fluid and a green coolant or A/C refrigerant fluid.
@XT2015 (response to quote1)
sad part is I had some great mechanics back home. One being my brother, he has been an ASE certified (FORD) mechanic since the mid/late 90's. He hates working on vehicles for me since I have never bought a ford lol but he will if needbe. I also had a friend who owned his own shop, it got to the point to where he would let me pull my vehicle into a bay and work on it there and would help me/teach me when needed. Then I divorced my husband and moved to Georgia to start over. Found one guy here, but he wanted more than just to work on cars so.... now if I need help, if I cant find it on youtube or if ihave problems I call my friend Josh in Indiana and he can usually talk me through it.

@Satito (response to quote 2)
when being a single mom with 3 very needy teens you don't have much choice but to be handy, not to mention I fully admit to being the biggest cheapskate you might ever meet/talk to. My theory is... if I can do it myself, why pay someone else to do it for me?

I found a great youtube video on doing this, since I do have a 2nd X that is not in working order I took the manifold off that one. In doing so it helped me find the smal 1 inch hose underneath on mine that was leaking. I did not have to remove the manifold on the working X to replace it either.

@XT2015 (response to quote 3)
this mystery has already been commented/solved by @Satito & @RacerXXL on page 5 (i think) of this post
 

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Discussion Starter #106
Update
Got curious on whether or not the distributor has anything to do with the high idle/engine surging/excessive gas use (only got 160 miles on 1 full tank 😳) ... Anyway, I pulled the plug wires off & went to remove the 2 bolts holding the cap on and... The entire distributor started moving 😮 turns out the bolt hole for the bolt at the bottom is stripped! Now what?!?!?!? That part is not exactly "replaceable"
 

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When using a tap it is super important to not force it and use plenty of lube. Turn it in a half turn to a full turn, then back it up a bit to clear the metal chips (they will fall into the little flutes on the tap) then in a little more, and back it out a little. Spray a little penetrating oil on it as you go to keep it lubed. I believe the hole is in aluminum, so it will be a very easy hole to tap. If you force it you stand a good chance of breaking the tap off in the hole, and that's a whole new headache so just take your time.
 

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Discussion Starter #109 (Edited)
Thanks guys... I will be attempting this tomorrow 🤞🏻

 
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Mine did the same as well, to many threads pulled out and couldn’t clean it up. Ended up installing a Time-sert to repair the threads. Helicoil will work just fine I personally just don’t like them but it will be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #111
ok question (yes I'm a cheap a**) are tap & die rethreaders the same as the helicoil rethreaders? Tried to google it but I couldn't get a straight response, plus these things are not really sold in stores - mostly online
 

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Discussion Starter #113

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Discussion Starter #116 (Edited)
Online only items are such a pain. The kit is nice because it has the drill, tap, install tool and the thread coils all in one place. Guards against buying the wrong individual tools.
I plan to get a kit so I never have to worry about it again , I was just trying to get it fixed now so my daughter can have her truck back, I'm kinda of sick of looking at it just sitting in my driveway, and she's been driving out 01 honda accord that has a power steering fluid leak 🙄 plus she's coming home from school this wknd, I thought it'd be nice if she could take her truck when she goes back
 

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As far as I know, a re-threader is not the same as a tap or die.

Taps and dies cut new threads; re-threaders (thread chasers, thread cleaners) are sized to go into the threads and remove loose material, but not cut new threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #118
As far as I know, a re-threader is not the same as a tap or die.

Taps and dies cut new threads; re-threaders (thread chasers, thread cleaners) are sized to go into the threads and remove loose material, but not cut new threads.
That doesn't sound right to me cuz you have to drill out the old (stripped) threads then add threads for the helicoil to catch onto 🤔
 

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That doesn't sound right to me cuz you have to drill out the old (stripped) threads then add threads for the helicoil to catch onto 🤔
I did some research and have come to the conclusion that I was correct in my statement that a rethreader is not the same as a tap or die.

A rethreader is for clearing, cleaning, or repairing dirty or damaged threads. It comes as a device that looks like a screwdriver that fixes threads in holes (aka, female threads), or as a matched pair that looks like a tap and a die but is still for the purpose of clearing, cleaning, or repairing dirty or damaged threads.

A matched tap and die set cuts new threads. The tap cuts them in a hole, and a die cuts them onto a stud or rod.

What you need is a thread repair/replacement kit, which I referred to by the brand name of Helicoil, and others referred to by other brand names. That kit does what was described above:
  1. it removes the stripped or damaged threads using a drill bit
  2. it cuts new threads into the wood or metal
  3. it allows you to insert a special set of replacement threads
  4. it restores the threads so that a fastener of the original size and pitch can be used

A. If you were to use a rethreader, you might be able to restore the original threads, but if too much metal is missing, you'll need to create new threads because the existing ones won't be able to hold the bolt securely.

B. If you were to drill the hole to remove the threads and then use a tap to cut new threads, your original fastener would not fit because the diameter has increased.

C. If you were to use a Helicoil (or other brand) of kit to drill it, tap it, and then install the replacement threads, you'd have a set of threads that would let you use your original bolt to hold down the dizzy.

Method C is what you're after, not methods A or B. (Don't forget to knock that tang off at the bottom before actually using the new threads!)
 

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Discussion Starter #120
I did some research and have come to the conclusion that I was correct in my statement that a rethreader is not the same as a tap or die.

A rethreader is for clearing, cleaning, or repairing dirty or damaged threads. It comes as a device that looks like a screwdriver that fixes threads in holes (aka, female threads), or as a matched pair that looks like a tap and a die but is still for the purpose of clearing, cleaning, or repairing dirty or damaged threads.

A matched tap and die set cuts new threads. The tap cuts them in a hole, and a die cuts them onto a stud or rod.

What you need is a thread repair/replacement kit, which I referred to by the brand name of Helicoil, and others referred to by other brand names. That kit does what was described above:
  1. it removes the stripped or damaged threads using a drill bit
  2. it cuts new threads into the wood or metal
  3. it allows you to insert a special set of replacement threads
  4. it restores the threads so that a fastener of the original size and pitch can be used

A. If you were to use a rethreader, you might be able to restore the original threads, but if too much metal is missing, you'll need to create new threads because the existing ones won't be able to hold the bolt securely.

B. If you were to drill the hole to remove the threads and then use a tap to cut new threads, your original fastener would not fit because the diameter has increased.

C. If you were to use a Helicoil (or other brand) of kit to drill it, tap it, and then install the replacement threads, you'd have a set of threads that would let you use your original bolt to hold down the dizzy.

Method C is what you're after, not methods A or B. (Don't forget to knock that tang off at the bottom before actually using the new threads!)
That actually answered my question, a bit high winded lol but exactly what I was after... Thank you
 
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