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2004 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (160k miles) & 2003 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (dead engine)
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Discussion Starter #81 (Edited)
Well the thermostat housing and the two hoses connected to that are worth a second look since they are directly above the water pump. Do you see any signs of coolant above the water pump or are all the traces below the pump? I would wipe a clean paper towel along the upper side of the pump and the thermostat housing to see if you pick up coolant traces on the paper towel. I would also have to wonder if all of the new water pump bolts are tightened properly. Assume nothing!
OBTW...what the devil is that bottle brush peaking out at us in the 2nd to last picture?
I did get as good of a look as I could above the water pump (before I had to take the camera scope back) and from what I can see all is dry.

That brush thing has a funny back story, I said the same thing, hang on & ill show you lol... I tagged you in another post on here where someone else found and asked about it
 

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2004 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (160k miles) & 2003 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (dead engine)
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95 Posts
Discussion Starter #82 (Edited)
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OK, armed with ALL the info I have gotten from y'all, this truck WILL be fixed today! One way or another 馃馃徎馃馃徎馃馃徎

.....or not 馃槴馃槴馃槴
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Looks like you have coolant; oil and power steering fluid leaks. Were you able to isolate the source of any one of those?
 

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2004 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (160k miles) & 2003 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (dead engine)
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95 Posts
Discussion Starter #84
Looks like you have coolant; oil and power steering fluid leaks. Were you able to isolate the source of any one of those?
Hmmm coolant... Shoddy seal job on water pump, oil... Recent rear main seal deteriation?, power steering... No clue
 

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Unfortunately there are a few small coolant lines that run under the intake manifold upper an lower plenum. These leak in a number of ways.
1) The hose is old and cracks.
2) The clamps fail (usually because someone used worm clamps instead of constant tension spring clamps). The worm clamps do not adjust size with the expansion and shrinking that goes along with the heat cycle. This result in the hose becoming compressed under the clamp and the clamp being loose.
3) The metal tubes that the hoses connect to rust. Mine rusted right at the ends (nipple if you will) and the resulting pitting etc made them leak at the connection.

Leaks in these areas tend to drip down onto the engine block under the intake and the fluid can run to the front of the engine unseen.
 

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2004 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (160k miles) & 2003 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (dead engine)
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95 Posts
Discussion Starter #87
Unfortunately there are a few small coolant lines that run under the intake manifold upper an lower plenum. These leak in a number of ways.
1) The hose is old and cracks.
2) The clamps fail (usually because someone used worm clamps instead of constant tension spring clamps). The worm clamps do not adjust size with the expansion and shrinking that goes along with the heat cycle. This result in the hose becoming compressed under the clamp and the clamp being loose.
3) The metal tubes that the hoses connect to rust. Mine rusted right at the ends (nipple if you will) and the resulting pitting etc made them leak at the connection.

Leaks in these areas tend to drip down onto the engine block under the intake and the fluid can run to the front of the engine unseen.
Unfortunately there are a few small coolant lines that run under the intake manifold upper an lower plenum. These leak in a number of ways.
1) The hose is old and cracks.
2) The clamps fail (usually because someone used worm clamps instead of constant tension spring clamps). The worm clamps do not adjust size with the expansion and shrinking that goes along with the heat cycle. This result in the hose becoming compressed under the clamp and the clamp being loose.
3) The metal tubes that the hoses connect to rust. Mine rusted right at the ends (nipple if you will) and the resulting pitting etc made them leak at the connection.

Leaks in these areas tend to drip down onto the engine block under the intake and the fluid can run to the front of the engine unseen.
I already found and replaced that 1" hose under there
 

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The steering fluid leak is on your pitman arm. It is most likely the pitman seal at the bottom of the steering gear. Very easy to replace and you don't have to remove the gear from the vehicle to do it. You rent a pitman puller from Autozone, Pepboys etc. You buy a pitman seal kit from Rock Auto (they're cheap).

You undo the bolt on the pitman arm, but leave it on slightly. Attach the puller and start to crank it down. It may start to move freely or it may be a stubborn sonofagun, in which case you amy hear a loud bang all of a sudden as it breaks free. This is why you leave the nut partially on. Then you remove the nut and mark the pitman arm and the spline on the the stearing gear so you can get the orientation correct when you put it back.

Then, there should be a snap ring and a washer before the seal. Remove them. After that I've used two different methods to remove the seal. One is to drill a small hole in the seal and then use a screw to pull the seal. Works great. The other is to put the but back on the end of the shaft, start the vehicle, and turn the steering wheel all the way to lock in one direction and all the way to lock in the other direction. If you have a helper they can watch and tell you when the seal is free. Make sure there is a pan under the steering gear because the hydraulic pressure will force the seal out and PSF will go everywhere. Keep track of how many turns you do so that you get the wheel back in it's original position. if it's off by a turn you will not be able to do tight turns in one direction and will need to pop the pitman arm off again to make the adjustment. Once the seal is out you simply pop the new seal in, drive it home gently being careful not to damage the seal or the mating surfaces. I like to rub a little clean power steering fluid on the sea to make sure it slides over the shaft easily. After it's in, put the new snap ring in, replace the pitman arm and tighten the bolt to spec. It is a fairly high torque.

Our vehicles are high enough that you shouldn't have to jack it up or put it on jack stands to do this. Do make sure it's in park and the parking brake is on though.
 

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2004 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (160k miles) & 2003 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (dead engine)
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Discussion Starter #89
The steering fluid leak is on your pitman arm. It is most likely the pitman seal at the bottom of the steering gear. Very easy to replace and you don't have to remove the gear from the vehicle to do it. You rent a pitman puller from Autozone, Pepboys etc. You buy a pitman seal kit from Rock Auto (they're cheap).

You undo the bolt on the pitman arm, but leave it on slightly. Attach the puller and start to crank it down. It may start to move freely or it may be a stubborn sonofagun, in which case you amy hear a loud bang all of a sudden as it breaks free. This is why you leave the nut partially on. Then you remove the nut and mark the pitman arm and the spline on the the stearing gear so you can get the orientation correct when you put it back.

Then, there should be a snap ring and a washer before the seal. Remove them. After that I've used two different methods to remove the seal. One is to drill a small hole in the seal and then use a screw to pull the seal. Works great. The other is to put the but back on the end of the shaft, start the vehicle, and turn the steering wheel all the way to lock in one direction and all the way to lock in the other direction. If you have a helper they can watch and tell you when the seal is free. Make sure there is a pan under the steering gear because the hydraulic pressure will force the seal out and PSF will go everywhere. Keep track of how many turns you do so that you get the wheel back in it's original position. if it's off by a turn you will not be able to do tight turns in one direction and will need to pop the pitman arm off again to make the adjustment. Once the seal is out you simply pop the new seal in, drive it home gently being careful not to damage the seal or the mating surfaces. I like to rub a little clean power steering fluid on the sea to make sure it slides over the shaft easily. After it's in, put the new snap ring in, replace the pitman arm and tighten the bolt to spec. It is a fairly high torque.

Our vehicles are high enough that you shouldn't have to jack it up or put it on jack stands to do this. Do make sure it's in park and the parking brake is on though.
I will be getting that job done as soon as I get this water pump issue dealt with ;-)
 

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2000 Xterra XE 4x4 3.3L AT
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Are you certain that coolant leak you are seeing, green fluid on the centerlink and pitman arm, is actually coolant? That is all below the AC compressor and leaking AC refrigerant is green.

Mine did the same thing and thought it was the head gasket. Turned out to be AC refrigerant from a bad high pressure line, the very same high pressure line it is on in your pics.
 

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2004 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (160k miles) & 2003 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (dead engine)
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Discussion Starter #92 (Edited)
Are you certain that coolant leak you are seeing, green fluid on the centerlink and pitman arm, is actually coolant? That is all below the AC compressor and leaking AC refrigerant is green.

Mine did the same thing and thought it was the head gasket. Turned out to be AC refrigerant from a bad high pressure line, the very same high pressure line it is on in your pics.
actually I wasn't sure what that green stuff was until seeing your comment. But the a/c compressor was recently replaced (by a different shop) after some moron backed into me over the summer so I guess I'll be taking it back to them and take advantage of that warranty
 

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2000 Xterra XE 4x4 3.3L AT
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9,440 Posts
actually I wasn't sure what that green stuff was until seeing your comment. But the a/c compressor was recently replaced (by a different shop) after some moron backed into me over the summer
From accident damage I would assume they replaced the condenser, looks like a radiator and is located in front of the actual radiator.

The high pressure line is a common failure on a lot of these trucks as they age.
 

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2004 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (160k miles) & 2003 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (dead engine)
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95 Posts
Discussion Starter #94
From accident damage I would assume they replaced the condenser, looks like a radiator and is located in front of the actual radiator.

The high pressure line is a common failure on a lot of these trucks as they age.
actually I'm still not sure why they replaced any a/c stuff. I was parked in a parking spot and the guy backed into me & it shifted the bumper into the driver front tire... the a/c wasn't working before he hit me but they fixed it and called it damage from the accident & charged his insurance for it
 

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2004 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (160k miles) & 2003 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (dead engine)
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95 Posts
Discussion Starter #96
The condenser is located fairly close to the bumper may have been damaged but in the end AC works now so (y)
you got me curious so I just found the shop bill/reciept for that repair and you are right, it says condenser. so does that mean I have to get the tools to discharge the a/c to repair the high pressure line?
 

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2004 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (160k miles) & 2003 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (dead engine)
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Discussion Starter #97
The steering fluid leak is on your pitman arm. It is most likely the pitman seal at the bottom of the steering gear. Very easy to replace and you don't have to remove the gear from the vehicle to do it. You rent a pitman puller from Autozone, Pepboys etc. You buy a pitman seal kit from Rock Auto (they're cheap).

You undo the bolt on the pitman arm, but leave it on slightly. Attach the puller and start to crank it down. It may start to move freely or it may be a stubborn sonofagun, in which case you amy hear a loud bang all of a sudden as it breaks free. This is why you leave the nut partially on. Then you remove the nut and mark the pitman arm and the spline on the the stearing gear so you can get the orientation correct when you put it back.

Then, there should be a snap ring and a washer before the seal. Remove them. After that I've used two different methods to remove the seal. One is to drill a small hole in the seal and then use a screw to pull the seal. Works great. The other is to put the but back on the end of the shaft, start the vehicle, and turn the steering wheel all the way to lock in one direction and all the way to lock in the other direction. If you have a helper they can watch and tell you when the seal is free. Make sure there is a pan under the steering gear because the hydraulic pressure will force the seal out and PSF will go everywhere. Keep track of how many turns you do so that you get the wheel back in it's original position. if it's off by a turn you will not be able to do tight turns in one direction and will need to pop the pitman arm off again to make the adjustment. Once the seal is out you simply pop the new seal in, drive it home gently being careful not to damage the seal or the mating surfaces. I like to rub a little clean power steering fluid on the sea to make sure it slides over the shaft easily. After it's in, put the new snap ring in, replace the pitman arm and tighten the bolt to spec. It is a fairly high torque.

Our vehicles are high enough that you shouldn't have to jack it up or put it on jack stands to do this. Do make sure it's in park and the parking brake is on though.
I may not have to jack it up but I definitely need my handy milk crate to stand on to get into the stuff up top lol (THANK YOU for this very detailed post, I greatly appreciate it!)
 

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2001 Xterra 4WD Auto 3.3L NA V6
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657 Posts
you got me curious so I just found the shop bill/reciept for that repair and you are right, it says condenser. so does that mean I have to get the tools to discharge the a/c to repair the high pressure line?
It takes more than the right tools to do an AC discharge and recharge. Before you get the tools, check to see if the AC is actually what's leaking, then make a choice. It might be cheaper all around to have a shop do it.

I'm a DIYer, too, but some things I prefer to have done at a shop. I had never changed a timing belt myself, although I understood the entire process. I bought my X in July, and in August I was knee-deep into the t-belt job.
 

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2004 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (160k miles) & 2003 xterra 6cyl 3.3L (dead engine)
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Discussion Starter #99
Took the X back to that shop today & they want another $500 to fix the shoddy seal job they did! I will not be using a repair shop ever again!!! Guess I'll be learning how to do a timing belt after all
 

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2001 Xterra 4WD Auto 3.3L NA V6
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Took the X back to that shop today & they want another $500 to fix the shoddy seal job they did! I will not be using a repair shop ever again!!! Guess I'll be learning how to do a timing belt after all
One bad apple doesn't mean the oranges are no good.

There are shops and/or mechanics that are worth their weight in gold. You've just found one that uses sand instead. Don't sell all shops down the river over the actions of one, but beware no matter what! Being informed increases your chances of getting a proper repair.

If you can prove to them that their work was subpar, make them fix it and this time, take a chair right next to it and observe every move without interfering. If they're not comfy with that, they're incompetent to start with and don't deserve to be working on your rig, or anyone else's for that matter.
 
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