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2001 se 4x4 5spd 32"
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271 Posts
Just the tools I need to change a flat tire and a jumper box.

Keep up on the maintenance and it's a very reliable truck.
 

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2004 Xterra XE 4WD Auto 3.3L NA V6
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2,531 Posts
I bought my 2004 nearly 800 miles from home. I carried no tools other than what came with the rig: jack, small lug wrench, etc.

I used the whole weekend to return home, taking my time and stopping along the way so my buddy, who died later that year, could take pictures and experience new things. So did I.

I agree with @NoFunBen. Keep up on the maintenance and you run a small risk of being sidelined.
 

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2000 Xterra XE 4x4 3.3L AT
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10,275 Posts
I go with a ton of spares as most of the parts on my truck are modified in some way so I can’t just go by something.

For most the advice posted before my post is pretty good
 

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Xterra SE 4x4 V6 NA
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121 Posts
Because it's impossible to predict everything that can go wrong with your Xterra, or any vehicle for that matter, it is best to do a thorough inspection before you go on any long trips.
If you cannot inspect everything yourself it might be worth the $50 to $100 to have a shop do a professional inspection. That is better than trying to carry every conceivable part that might fail with you. You don't want to be weighed down with a ton of car parts that you might not need.

If your belts are old and showing cracks then change them before you go on the trip.
If your X is over 100,000 miles and still has the original factory timing belt then get it changed before going on the trip.
If the timing belt breaks while out in the wilderness you will have to be towed back.
Changing a timing belt is an all day job even for a shop, which would make it virtually impossible to do in the woods because it requires disassembling a lot of things in front of the engine.

As far as spare parts you should carry, that depends upon what kind of trip you're going on.
If you're going to do a lot of off-roading, or just traveling on rough back roads that are full of rocks, make sure to take a spare air filter for the dusty environment, radiator hoses and coolant, and a 5 gallon container of gas since Xterra's burn more fuel when crawling along trails. And some spare belts won't hurt just in case you run over a bush and the branches get caught in the pulleys.

If you have an inspection done before you leave you can get potential problems fixed before going out into the wild, or on a long highway trip.
Remember the old saying, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

It is also wise to invest in an air compressor. I have a Viair 12VDC compressor that I have used many times.
I am not a heavy off-roader but I have gone onto really rough forest roads that have sharp rocks sticking out of the ground. Airing down the tires helps reduce the possibility of punctures by making the tire more flexible. By having a portable compressor you can re-pressurize the tires when you return to the pavement.

I also have a small tool kit of metric wrenches and sockets, along with both a Phillips and flathead screwdrivers.
I also have a torque wrench in case I need to tighten fasteners that are torque sensitive, such as wheel nuts.

If you're just going on a highway sight-seeing road trip make sure to carry plenty of drinking water, some non-perishable food, and a couple of flashlights in case you break down at night.
My Xterra came with a first aid kit, so if yours did not you might want to get one of those too.
You might also want to have a pair of rubber boots on hand in case you break down on a muddy dirt road.

There are probably other things you can carry but it depends on what kind of trip you're going on and for how long.
 

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Because it's impossible to predict everything that can go wrong with your Xterra, or any vehicle for that matter, it is best to do a thorough inspection before you go on any long trips.
If you cannot inspect everything yourself it might be worth the $50 to $100 to have a shop do a professional inspection. That is better than trying to carry every conceivable part that might fail with you. You don't want to be weighed down with a ton of car parts that you might not need.

If your belts are old and showing cracks then change them before you go on the trip.
If your X is over 100,000 miles and still has the original factory timing belt then get it changed before going on the trip.
If the timing belt breaks while out in the wilderness you will have to be towed back.
Changing a timing belt is an all day job even for a shop, which would make it virtually impossible to do in the woods because it requires disassembling a lot of things in front of the engine.

As far as spare parts you should carry, that depends upon what kind of trip you're going on.
If you're going to do a lot of off-roading, or just traveling on rough back roads that are full of rocks, make sure to take a spare air filter for the dusty environment, radiator hoses and coolant, and a 5 gallon container of gas since Xterra's burn more fuel when crawling along trails. And some spare belts won't hurt just in case you run over a bush and the branches get caught in the pulleys.

If you have an inspection done before you leave you can get potential problems fixed before going out into the wild, or on a long highway trip.
Remember the old saying, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

It is also wise to invest in an air compressor. I have a Viair 12VDC compressor that I have used many times.
I am not a heavy off-roader but I have gone onto really rough forest roads that have sharp rocks sticking out of the ground. Airing down the tires helps reduce the possibility of punctures by making the tire more flexible. By having a portable compressor you can re-pressurize the tires when you return to the pavement.

I also have a small tool kit of metric wrenches and sockets, along with both a Phillips and flathead screwdrivers.
I also have a torque wrench in case I need to tighten fasteners that are torque sensitive, such as wheel nuts.

If you're just going on a highway sight-seeing road trip make sure to carry plenty of drinking water, some non-perishable food, and a couple of flashlights in case you break down at night.
My Xterra came with a first aid kit, so if yours did not you might want to get one of those too.
You might also want to have a pair of rubber boots on hand in case you break down on a muddy dirt road.

There are probably other things you can carry but it depends on what kind of trip you're going on and for how long.
I was suggesting a (survival repair box) as I had happen on a camping trip had two flats at the same time and only one spear tire that was also flat. I had no compressor, no plugs. Fortunately a camper near by ran my tire up to closest tire repair. From then on I carry tire plugs, glue, and quality air compressor Viair brand ( screws into valve stem) We also did from 2015-2020 long offroad excursions, where little signs of life and no cell service, mostly Mojave desert preserve, Kofa game range and Wiley Well road area
 

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Xterra SE 4x4 V6 NA
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I was suggesting a (survival repair box) as I had happen on a camping trip had two flats at the same time and only one spear tire that was also flat. I had no compressor, no plugs. Fortunately a camper near by ran my tire up to closest tire repair. From then on I carry tire plugs, glue, and quality air compressor Viair brand ( screws into valve stem) We also did from 2015-2020 long offroad excursions, where little signs of life and no cell service, mostly Mojave desert preserve, Kofa game range and Wiley Well road area
Are you referring to the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge in western Arizona?
I used to live east of there near Tonopah.
I never went into that area during the summer months.
There are some parts of Arizona where the roads are so bad that it is recommended that you carry two spare tires.

I don't know if it is possible but maybe you could check into using inner tubes as an emergency fix if the puncture it too big to plug.

If you spend a lot of time in the wilderness with no cell service, you might want to check into a satellite phone. Those can call out from anywhere. Some truck drivers carry them, but they are expensive.

You could also bring a bicycle for each person that is with you. That way if it is worst case scenario and you can't get the vehicle moving you could at least pedal back to civilization and get help.
 

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What kind of spare parts are you guys taking on board for long journeys? (500+ miles)
Xterra's wrenches are 10mm,14mm, 12mm, 15mm,17mm, but referring to changing belts, hoses, and flats. I've four wheeled for 48 years and seen a lot of weird stuff. Most break down are tires, batteries, batteries connections! And I maintain and service replace belts, fuel pump, filters.
 

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Are you referring to the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge in western Arizona?
I used to live east of there near Tonopah.
I never went into that area during the summer months.
There are some parts of Arizona where the roads are so bad that it is recommended that you carry two spare tires.

I don't know if it is possible but maybe you could check into using inner tubes as an emergency fix if the puncture it too big to plug.

If you spend a lot of time in the wilderness with no cell service, you might want to check into a satellite phone. Those can call out from anywhere. Some truck drivers carry them, but they are expensive.

You could also bring a bicycle for each person that is with you. That way if it is worst case scenario and you can't get the vehicle moving you could at least pedal back to civilization and get help.
We've driven thru Kofa Game range several times, there is a map of area, the Arizona atlas is good choice. There is also three hunter cabins in the area as well. The first time we traveled we stared at Eagaltail road in Harqahala valley to Calton well 30 miles west then south, by mistake thru the Yuma marine bombing range, on to Engesser pass road to King mine roadcand on to Hwy. 95 back to Quartzsite, Az long day.
 

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Xterra SE 4x4 V6 NA
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We've driven thru Kofa Game range several times, there is a map of area, the Arizona atlas is good choice. There is also three hunter cabins in the area as well. The first time we traveled we stared at Eagaltail road in Harqahala valley to Calton well 30 miles west then south, by mistake thru the Yuma marine bombing range, on to Engesser pass road to King mine roadcand on to Hwy. 95 back to Quartzsite, Az long day.
I know roughly where you're talking about.
I make my living as a landscape photographer and I visited the Eagle Tail Mountain Wilderness several times.
I got some lightning photos of Courthouse Rock.
One of those photos is for sale through American Furniture Warehouse.
I would post a link, but I don't know if its allowed here or not.
 

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I know roughly where you're talking about.
I make my living as a landscape photographer and I visited the Eagle Tail Mountain Wilderness several times.
I got some lightning photos of Courthouse Rock.
One of those photos is for sale through American Furniture Warehouse.
I would post a link, but I don't know if its allowed here or not.
Over the years I've come across three hermit type men living out in the wilderness, to a plane crash (no bodies) to a rock hounding camp with three old trailers tow of which were packed with paintings by June King, I researched name (art director at Univ.of Oregon) in the desert south of Wiley Well road (I-10 west of Blythe, ca. Places I have named, bathtub house, mad max house, paint splatter, house. I found these via Google Earth I call home stead junk. But have since sold the 4x4 retired from exploring at our age (70)
 

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Xterra SE 4x4 V6 NA
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Over the years I've come across three hermit type men living out in the wilderness, to a plane crash (no bodies) to a rock hounding camp with three old trailers tow of which were packed with paintings by June King, I researched name (art director at Univ.of Oregon) in the desert south of Wiley Well road (I-10 west of Blythe, ca. Places I have named, bathtub house, mad max house, paint splatter, house. I found these via Google Earth I call home stead junk. But have since sold the 4x4 retired from exploring at our age (70)
I have not ventured over into California but I have been as far west as Quartzsite. I have photos of the historic Joseph Cone stone cabin.
I have journeyed through most of Arizona. I photograph landscapes, nature, and abandoned ghost towns.

There are a few places in southern AZ I have wanted to go, but they are too dangerous now with the illegal immigration.
Right now I am focused on northern Arizona since I live just north of Prescott.
Before moving to Prescott in 2018 I had lived off-grid in the desert near Tonopah since 1995.

Although I am pushing 59 myself I have no intentions of retiring. As long as I can walk and drive into the wilderness to do my photography work I will keep going until the day I die. Right now the only thing slowing me down is the high gas prices. I used to go out on my photo trips once a week. Now I can only afford it once a month.

The agencies I sell my photos through have been asking for new photos, but I have had to tell them that until gas comes down or they pay me more money I am going to be limited for the time being.
 

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I have not ventured over into California but I have been as far west as Quartzsite. I have photos of the historic Joseph Cone stone cabin.
I have journeyed through most of Arizona. I photograph landscapes, nature, and abandoned ghost towns.

There are a few places in southern AZ I have wanted to go, but they are too dangerous now with the illegal immigration.
Right now I am focused on northern Arizona since I live just north of Prescott.
Before moving to Prescott in 2018 I had lived off-grid in the desert near Tonopah since 1995.

Although I am pushing 59 myself I have no intentions of retiring. As long as I can walk and drive into the wilderness to do my photography work I will keep going until the day I die. Right now the only thing slowing me down is the high gas prices. I used to go out on my photo trips once a week. Now I can only afford it once a month.

The agencies I sell my photos through have been asking for new photos, but I have had to tell them that until gas comes down or they pay me more money I am going to be limited for the time being.
The only road I'd like to go on is Rug Road, starting at Mammoth, Az 4x4 needed, ends up in Aravaipa canyon by Klondike, Az. On one trip we drove from Ludlow, Ca north across Broadwell dry lake, came across two prepper cabins, Bacon airstrip, and Megaphone (look up on You tube) then on Afton Canyon. California probably pretty pricey for gas now. Good luck and stay safe in your travels.
 
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