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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2004 and have heard that having a rear sway bar is not necessary for 1st gens. It does nothing on road and can hurt offroad such as: limiting flex, braking the sway bar, braking a shock, or a combination of those.
Is this all true? Anyone have a bad experience with this and are their any risks I should be aware of?
I drive on curvy mountain roads often and it is my daily, will the removal cause issues with that?
Lastly, if in a crash will it void my insurance?
Thanks guys!
 

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I have a 2004 and have heard that having a rear sway bar is not necessary for 1st gens. It does nothing on road and can hurt offroad such as: limiting flex, braking the sway bar, braking a shock, or a combination of those.
Is this all true? Anyone have a bad experience with this and are their any risks I should be aware of?
I drive on curvy mountain roads often and it is my daily, will the removal cause issues with that?
Lastly, if in a crash will it void my insurance?
Thanks guys!
If you crash and its because you needed a rear sway bar, they can't "void your insurance", but they could argue that it was a contributory cause...but they'd have to show how.

There is enough evidence out there that the rear bar won't prevent any accidents though, as most people can't even tell the difference with, or without it.

Some who said they could tell, when it was changed w/o them knowing, to test, couldn't tell.

People who tow boats, etc, w/o that bar, say its that same as with it...and so forth.

If it breaks your passenger side rear shock (A LOT of people have had it do that) or rip off your brake lines (Also a problem that has happened), etc...THAT can cause an accident...so, LEAVING the bar on, so far, has been MORE of a problem, historically.

As its a reversible procedure, I always recommend that you choose a curvy road you are familiar with, and drive though it a few times as is...and then remove the bar and do it again...and see if you can tell the difference.

No one who's done that reported a difference so far, so, its at least a subtle one if at all. Many report that the ride is less rough, but not that it handled differently.

If you DO feel that there's a difference, maybe your tire and suspension scenario is just different, etc...just put the bar back on and call it a day...no harm no foul.

Its a 15 minute project to remove it, and 10 to put it back on (Rust the first time)...so, not a big investment in time, etc.

That way, YOU can decide for yourself, w/o taking random people on the web's word for it.
 

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I'm a random dude on the internet and I say ditch it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If you crash and its because you needed a rear sway bar, they can't "void your insurance", but they could argue that it was a contributory cause...but they'd have to show how.

There is enough evidence out there that the rear bar won't prevent any accidents though, as most people can't even tell the difference with, or without it.

Some who said they could tell, when it was changed w/o them knowing, to test, couldn't tell.

People who tow boats, etc, w/o that bar, say its that same as with it...and so forth.

If it breaks your passenger side rear shock (A LOT of people have had it do that) or rip off your brake lines (Also a problem that has happened), etc...THAT can cause an accident...so, LEAVING the bar on, so far, has been MORE of a problem, historically.

As its a reversible procedure, I always recommend that you choose a curvy road you are familiar with, and drive though it a few times as is...and then remove the bar and do it again...and see if you can tell the difference.

No one who's done that reported a difference so far, so, its at least a subtle one if at all. Many report that the ride is less rough, but not that it handled differently.

If you DO feel that there's a difference, maybe your tire and suspension scenario is just different, etc...just put the bar back on and call it a day...no harm no foul.

Its a 15 minute project to remove it, and 10 to put it back on (Rust the first time)...so, not a big investment in time, etc.

That way, YOU can decide for yourself, w/o taking random people on the web's word for it.
Thanks for the info, just took it off and drove around a bit and can't tell a difference at all. I'll take it on a curvy road later and test that out.
 
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