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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2012 Xterra with the V6 and 105k miles on it.
The owner's manual says it takes 5 3/8 quarts with a new filter and 5 1/8 quarts if you leave the old filter in.
I don't know anyone who doesn't change the filter when they change the oil.

Getting lazy and tired of the stupid access door to the filter, I had my local vehicle service guy to change the oil and filter.
Knowing this garage, they put in what the manual recommends.
No way would they put in more.
Days later, I checked the oil level, and found it was over-filled.
It was well above the upper marker on the dip stick.

When I changed the oil and filter myself a couple days ago, I put in exactly 5 quarts.
After driving it for about 20 miles and then letting it sit overnight, I checked the oil level.
It was just between the low and high marks, right where it should be.
Could the manual be wrong?

What has been the experience of others about this?
 

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2004 Xterra XE 4WD Auto 3.3L NA V6
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I'd start with using what the manual said while checking around to see if the dipstick could be the wrong one or marked wrong.
 

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I don't know anyone who doesn't change the filter when they change the oil
When I’m resealing the lower oil pan under warranty, all of the oil gets drained and the filter does not get changed.



Could the manual be wrong?
it’s always possible but unlikely. For a long time at Nissan, all models took either a 15208-9E000, or a 15208-65F00. The gasket diameter and threads are the same. The difference is the length of the filter. Most aftermarket filters are the short style only for maximum compatibility and if this filter type is used, the oil level will show overfilled if the factory quantity is used.
 

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I have a 2012 Xterra with the V6 and 105k miles on it.
The owner's manual says it takes 5 3/8 quarts with a new filter and 5 1/8 quarts if you leave the old filter in.
I don't know anyone who doesn't change the filter when they change the oil.

Getting lazy and tired of the stupid access door to the filter, I had my local vehicle service guy to change the oil and filter.
Knowing this garage, they put in what the manual recommends.
No way would they put in more.
Days later, I checked the oil level, and found it was over-filled.
It was well above the upper marker on the dip stick.

When I changed the oil and filter myself a couple days ago, I put in exactly 5 quarts.
After driving it for about 20 miles and then letting it sit overnight, I checked the oil level.
It was just between the low and high marks, right where it should be.
Could the manual be wrong?

What has been the experience of others about this?
Mine's a 2004, so the V6 in mine is different.
But the manual for mine says it only takes 3.50 quarts with the filter.
If your manual says 5 and 3/8ths quarts and it ended up being overfilled then you might have a manual for a different model.
You could always check with a Nissan dealer to see if the manual is in error when it comes to the oil capacity. It's rare, but sometimes there can be misprints.
As far as changing the filter, I always change the filter with every oil change.
Oil filters are pretty cheap and do help keep the oil clean of any small amount of dust that might get into the engine and particles created from normal engine wear.
 

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I suppose that the oil filter has to do double-duty when using a K&N that lets in more dirt and dust than other filters.
 

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I suppose that the oil filter has to do double-duty when using a K&N that lets in more dirt and dust than other filters.

We've had that discussion before.
There is no way to prevent all dust from getting into the engine without starving off the air.
Changing the oil and oil filter is more important than trying to stop every microscopic particle of outside dust from getting in.
As I mentioned in a separate thread I had used K&N on another vehicle for 10 years and the engine never had any internal problems because I changed the oil and oil filter very regularly.
That vehicle had 246,000 miles on it when I traded it in and it was still running fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all these helpful comments. In all cases that I can remember, the screw-on filter has been a short one. Chances are, that is the reason why putting in the recommended amount of 5 3/8 quart over fills the crankcase. From now on, I will fill it with 5 quarts and keep an eye on the level over time.
 

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I’m going to go ahead and award points to Blackberry here. He should get extra points for even providing part numbers
I'm going to award him Brownie points, some extra Rep points, and several Atta-boys. Your volunteer service here as a member is always appreciated, especially because you spend your days making at living at it and then stop by to share that for the benefit of others. IT DOES NOT GO UNNOTICED or UNAPPRECIATED!
 

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My apologies to all for the long post and for hijacking the thread.
We've had that discussion before.
There is no way to prevent all dust from getting into the engine without starving off the air.
Changing the oil and oil filter is more important than trying to stop every microscopic particle of outside dust from getting in.
As I mentioned in a separate thread I had used K&N on another vehicle for 10 years and the engine never had any internal problems because I changed the oil and oil filter very regularly.
That vehicle had 246,000 miles on it when I traded it in and it was still running fine.
We've discussed the subject before, but the new part of it is that you feel that an oil filter is essential to keep the oil clean.

I made the comment above in an effort to show that your logic on filtration is illogical. You want the oil to be clean, and yet you don't mind that the air is not. It's a fact that an air filter like the oiled-cotton K&N allows larger particles to get through, and that more of the smaller particles get through as well. By your own admission, some of those get into the oil.

If clean oil is important, then clean air should be just as important in the effort to keep the oil clean, even if you don't mind sucking in what amounts to be sandpaper.

If you want the finest details in an image, you'll use film that is a lower ASA/ISO rating because the grains of 64 are smaller than those of 1600. You're a photographer, so it makes sense without further explanation.

Getting scratches and swirls out of paint requires the use of very fine rubbing compounds, starting with scratch remover, then swirl remover, and then rubbing compounds to bring the paint to a shine.

Getting the best finish on cabinets uses the same method. Sand with 80-grit to remove the coarse stuff, then 120 to improve the finish, and then maybe 220 or higher to make it really nice before applying the finish.

How much air is consumed by the 3.3L when it needs the most air? According to an online air filter calculator that I found, it consumes about 220 CFM and needs a minimum filtration area of 70½ square inches. Our filters are about 11¼ x 6¾, which is about 76 square inches. There's already more than enough filtration with a standard paper filter to provide the continuous needs of the engine at maximum RPM. Our filters are not grossly oversized, but more than capable of doing their jobs without modifications.

Nobody I know drives a normal car with a rock on the gas pedal, so max airflow at redline is not a selling point or even germane to the discussion.

The figures I used for the engine were 33oo cc, 180 HP, 6ooo peak RPM; for the filter, 286mm x 171mm (converted 11.25" x 6.75" from above).

When you're hypermiling, you're running your engine closer to 1/3 of the max of 6ooo that I used, so the airflow has less restriction due to a lower airflow, and the filter will be able to do its job more easily.

You say "clean the oil" with one side of your mouth, and "let in more air even if it's dirty" with the other side. My comment above was to point out the difference in thoughts and to bring some clear thinking to the discussion.

Facts are facts: suck in dirty air and the engine suffers, both inside the cylinders and from dirtier oil. When you make public statements that can't be backed up by sound thinking, and then try to convince others that you're right and they're wrong, that's when I step up and say something.

I think you're doing a good thing by working hard to get the max MPG from your rig, and I don't want to discourage that. The only thing I see wrong with your method is the choice of air filter. Where the discussion took a detour and became a long, drawn-out debate is when you insisted that K&N won't harm your engine and presented no facts to support that. I've presented videos and facts. I'd like to ask that you do the same, and that you do so with as little bias toward trying to prove your point, but rather with the view of learning something in the process and maybe even being willing to admit that you may have erred in your calculations, statements, or assumptions.

Air filter size calculator here: https://strikeengine.com/air-filter-size-calculator-for-power-bhp/

Panel air filter (scroll down for size): https://www.amazon.com/EPAuto-CA4309-Replacement-Infiniti-Selected/dp/B07F3CFWC5/ref=sr_1_3?content-id=amzn1.sym.5dfba980-229f-416b-a787-ff627e8ff43e%3Aamzn1.sym.5dfba980-229f-416b-a787-ff627e8ff43e&crid=34HHQPMF9YL4V&keywords=air%2Bfilter&pd_rd_r=2376e98e-4a92-46b5-87a2-4f8f7c69ccf8&pd_rd_w=TtAl9&pd_rd_wg=mKDwr&pf_rd_p=5dfba980-229f-416b-a787-ff627e8ff43e&pf_rd_r=6EDSVJ57P1TP0784XGBC&qid=1656153934&s=automotive&sprefix=air%2Bfilter%2B2004%2Bxterra%2Cautomotive%2C103&sr=1-3&vehicle=2004-67-901-49--9-9-8-7493-1743-9-2-2249-18-6&vehicleName=2004%2BNissan%2BXterra&th=1
 

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My apologies to all for the long post and for hijacking the thread.

We've discussed the subject before, but the new part of it is that you feel that an oil filter is essential to keep the oil clean.

I made the comment above in an effort to show that your logic on filtration is illogical. You want the oil to be clean, and yet you don't mind that the air is not. It's a fact that an air filter like the oiled-cotton K&N allows larger particles to get through, and that more of the smaller particles get through as well. By your own admission, some of those get into the oil.

If clean oil is important, then clean air should be just as important in the effort to keep the oil clean, even if you don't mind sucking in what amounts to be sandpaper.

If you want the finest details in an image, you'll use film that is a lower ASA/ISO rating because the grains of 64 are smaller than those of 1600. You're a photographer, so it makes sense without further explanation.

Getting scratches and swirls out of paint requires the use of very fine rubbing compounds, starting with scratch remover, then swirl remover, and then rubbing compounds to bring the paint to a shine.

Getting the best finish on cabinets uses the same method. Sand with 80-grit to remove the coarse stuff, then 120 to improve the finish, and then maybe 220 or higher to make it really nice before applying the finish.

How much air is consumed by the 3.3L when it needs the most air? According to an online air filter calculator that I found, it consumes about 220 CFM and needs a minimum filtration area of 70½ square inches. Our filters are about 11¼ x 6¾, which is about 76 square inches. There's already more than enough filtration with a standard paper filter to provide the continuous needs of the engine at maximum RPM. Our filters are not grossly oversized, but more than capable of doing their jobs without modifications.

Nobody I know drives a normal car with a rock on the gas pedal, so max airflow at redline is not a selling point or even germane to the discussion.

The figures I used for the engine were 33oo cc, 180 HP, 6ooo peak RPM; for the filter, 286mm x 171mm (converted 11.25" x 6.75" from above).

When you're hypermiling, you're running your engine closer to 1/3 of the max of 6ooo that I used, so the airflow has less restriction due to a lower airflow, and the filter will be able to do its job more easily.

You say "clean the oil" with one side of your mouth, and "let in more air even if it's dirty" with the other side. My comment above was to point out the difference in thoughts and to bring some clear thinking to the discussion.

Facts are facts: suck in dirty air and the engine suffers, both inside the cylinders and from dirtier oil. When you make public statements that can't be backed up by sound thinking, and then try to convince others that you're right and they're wrong, that's when I step up and say something.

I think you're doing a good thing by working hard to get the max MPG from your rig, and I don't want to discourage that. The only thing I see wrong with your method is the choice of air filter. Where the discussion took a detour and became a long, drawn-out debate is when you insisted that K&N won't harm your engine and presented no facts to support that. I've presented videos and facts. I'd like to ask that you do the same, and that you do so with as little bias toward trying to prove your point, but rather with the view of learning something in the process and maybe even being willing to admit that you may have erred in your calculations, statements, or assumptions.

Air filter size calculator here: https://strikeengine.com/air-filter-size-calculator-for-power-bhp/

Panel air filter (scroll down for size): https://www.amazon.com/EPAuto-CA4309-Replacement-Infiniti-Selected/dp/B07F3CFWC5/ref=sr_1_3?content-id=amzn1.sym.5dfba980-229f-416b-a787-ff627e8ff43e%3Aamzn1.sym.5dfba980-229f-416b-a787-ff627e8ff43e&crid=34HHQPMF9YL4V&keywords=air%2Bfilter&pd_rd_r=2376e98e-4a92-46b5-87a2-4f8f7c69ccf8&pd_rd_w=TtAl9&pd_rd_wg=mKDwr&pf_rd_p=5dfba980-229f-416b-a787-ff627e8ff43e&pf_rd_r=6EDSVJ57P1TP0784XGBC&qid=1656153934&s=automotive&sprefix=air%2Bfilter%2B2004%2Bxterra%2Cautomotive%2C103&sr=1-3&vehicle=2004-67-901-49--9-9-8-7493-1743-9-2-2249-18-6&vehicleName=2004%2BNissan%2BXterra&th=1
First, my original comment in this thread was about motor oil. I never brought up reusable air filters. You did that in a succeeding comment which I responded to.
Secondly, I never said that motor oil was essential to keeping the engine clean. I said it was essential to keep the engine lubricated and that motor oil HELPS keep the engine clean.
That was the purpose of that particular comment.

I have read several articles about motor oil. Premium synthetics contain dispersants and detergents that grab dirt and other contaminants that get into the engine and keeps those particles in suspension so that the oil filter can remove them. According to some articles I have read regular oil changes will keep the engine running better and longer than starving the engine of air with a highly restrictive air filter because it is unrealistic to try and keep ALL particles out the engine.

Here is one article that explains some of what I was trying to say about how the proper motor oil helps clean the engine.
Scroll down the page to the section that says Cleaning the Engine.
 

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Thank you for your response.

I see your point about using an oil filter to help keep the oil clean, while the oil helps keep the engine clean.

It seems that neither of us will back off of our opinions about the level of filtration, or lack thereof, done by oiled-cotton air filters. But it still begs the question: Why introduce more contaminants into the engine at the top end, only to have the bottom end have to work harder? It's like getting all cleaned up to go out on the town, and then running through mud puddles. That may be a bit of an exaggerated analogy, but it fits. What good is a clean oil gallery if the top end is being torn up? That's where my head is, and I think you've come to realize that without beating this dead horse any more.
 

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Thank you for your response.

I see your point about using an oil filter to help keep the oil clean, while the oil helps keep the engine clean.

It seems that neither of us will back off of our opinions about the level of filtration, or lack thereof, done by oiled-cotton air filters. But it still begs the question: Why introduce more contaminants into the engine at the top end, only to have the bottom end have to work harder? It's like getting all cleaned up to go out on the town, and then running through mud puddles. That may be a bit of an exaggerated analogy, but it fits. What good is a clean oil gallery if the top end is being torn up? That's where my head is, and I think you've come to realize that without beating this dead horse any more.
Without trying to beat a dead horse, as you put it, I am only sharing my personal experience and research. I have used reusable air filters for two different vehicles in the last 20 years without any bad effects. Matter of fact, the only problems I have ever had with my past vehicles were external. Things like water pumps, alternators, fuel pumps...etc. I have never had any of my vehicles repaired for an internal engine problem.

For me it is more important to get the best MPG as possible due to the current high fuel costs. A more restrictive air filter might keep the intake cleaner on a microscopic level but it results in higher fuel costs which adds up very quickly if you do a lot of highway driving.
Plus, I don't drive my rig in places that would expose it to the kind of dirt that could get past the air filter I use. I travel very slowly on dirt roads and I don't splash through mud holes if I can help it.
Matter of fact, if I see that a road is too rough or too muddy I will park and either walk or ride my bicycle the rest of the way since my goals are to do my photography work, not driving off-road for the fun of it.
Now if you're an off-road enthusiast that enjoys running through mud and sand then of course you will need a filter that keeps that kind of gunk out of your intake. And I believe I mentioned in my original posting about K&N filters that if you're driving in extremely dusty or muddy environments you may need to put in a more restrictive filter as a precaution.

But since I don't drive like that I would rather have higher air flow to improve fuel efficiency.

For me changing the oil more frequently to help keep the internal engine clean is more cost effective than paying the high fuel costs due to a restrictive air filter, especially since most of my driving is highway.
And I change my oil in the Xterra every 4 months, whether it needs it or not.

The last vehicle I used a K&N on was a RAM 2500 with the cummins turbo diesel. I bought the truck new back in 2006. I put the K&N on it when it got past 40,000 miles.
When I traded it in for the Xterra my old truck had 246,000 miles and was still using the K&N I had bought for it about 10 years earlier.
During the 10 years I ran that truck with the K&N I pulled the filter once every 6 months to clean it and re-oil it. I also changed the crankcase oil and fuel filter at the same time.
But I changed the oil filter in the truck every 60 days because diesels produce more soot than gasoline engines.
During that time the only things that went wrong with the truck was a failed water pump, fuel pump, and the front axle seal had to be replaced. But the engine never failed or displayed any performance problems.
Matter of fact, during the time I ran my truck with the K&N filter it did get a lot better MPG. It was EPA rated 16 city and 19 highway, which coincidentally is near the same rating as the Xterra.
With the K&N my RAM got 19 to 20 city and 24 MPG highway.

Since I had such a good experience with K&N on my truck I decided it might be worth trying on my Xterra.

Now I am not saying everybody should use a K&N, or any other high flow air filter. It depends upon how you use your vehicle. If you're driving mostly off-road in mud and sand, then the K&N is not for you. But if you're driving mostly on paved roads, and only going occasionally off road, and want to save on fuel costs, then the K&N might work for you.
That is all I am saying.

By the way, the reason I traded in my truck for the Xterra was because when I originally got my truck I had a delivery business and needed it for that purpose. After I went into my photography full time I found the truck was just too cumbersome on narrow and twisty back roads. I needed something smaller and more maneuverable in tight spaces.
I liked the Xterra because it reminded me of a Jeep Cherokee I had back in the 1990s.
The dealer I traded my truck to for the Xterra actually told me my truck was worth more than the Xterra even with the mileage on the truck.
As part of the trade the dealer gave me a 15 day warranty and new tires. The tires alone were worth over $1000. And he paid my plates and registration for one year.

I know this was a digression but I wanted to convey that I had a good experience with K&N and along with regular oil changes my old truck lasted a long time.
 
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