Nissan XTerra Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ill give a little more detail. My toolbox is pretty barebones. I have nothing fancy.

Anyone just have general tools to recommend thatll save me time and not getting frustrated?

Ill also list off some projects I want to do:
Torsion bar lift, rear shackles, installing steel bumpers, supercharger swap, and basic maintenance like oil changes etc etc.
 

·
Registered
2003, Xterra XE, 4x4, manual trans
Joined
·
40 Posts
Initial thoughts: Torque wrenchs (1/4" & 1/2") - socket fitting. Metric socket set and spanners. Screw driver and plier sets. Haynes repair manual for a bathroom reader. All the best !
 

·
Registered
Xterra SE 4x4 V6 NA
Joined
·
129 Posts
As far as tools, you'll want metric wrenches and sockets.
I have only needed to do some minor work, but all of the nuts and bolts were metric between 10mm and 14mm. Some might be bigger.

As far as maintenance, I change my oil every 4 months whether it needs it or not.
I find it easier to schedule an oil change on the calendar rather than count miles. Even if you don't drive it much it is recommended that the oil be change at least twice a year to remove water condensation.
I did not need a wrench for the oil filter. I was able to pull mine off by hand, and oil filters should not be so tight that they require a lot of wrenching to remove. An over tight oil filter can split the rubber ring on the filter and cause a leak. I find that hand tight is good enough for an oil filter.

If you have an automatic trans you should check into getting it flushed as a precaution. Contamination of the fluid can cause shifting problems.

Spark plugs last over 100,000 miles, so if you have done that recently you should be set for a long time.
Air Filter should be checked at least once every couple of months and shaken out if you live in a dusty environment.
If you use a washable air filter, like K&N, you'll want to clean and re-oil it twice a year.

The only other major maintenance I would check into is the timing belt. It is recommended that those be changed after the first 105,000 miles.
If your X is over 100,000 you may want to check into that because if the belt breaks the engine could be damaged.
I was lucky in that the dealer I got mine from had already changed the timing belt and tuned it up.
But if you got yours from a private seller do not assume any of the recommended maintenance has been done.
 

·
Administrator
2000 Xterra XE 4x4 3.3L AT
Joined
·
10,281 Posts
Cheapest way to do it is to buy what you need as you go. Buying sets of wrenches and sockets will leave you with sockets/wrenches you never use. I own in excess of $65,000 in tools, mostly Snap On, and it makes me laugh, and cry, when I look at a rack of 3/8 sockets and they look well worn but cared for and there are 3 to 4 pristine 30 year old sockets in the set that I’ve never used.

That being said you have to start somewhere so a basic metric set may be a good start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,727 Posts
Start with a socket and wrench kit that has both SAE and metric. I went with a 100+ piece socket and wrench set from Costco initially. It was $99. That gave me the basics needed to get started on any of my vehicles as well as to do other work around the house (lawnmowers, tractor, garage door etc.). If you go with a set DO get a name brand set (even if it's Kirkland). The ratchets in a no name bargain Ebay China set will not hold up and the sockets are going to be much more likely to crack.

Then, as I worked on my X (and other vehicles) I added the larger sockets and wrenches as they were needed by purchasing individual items at Home Depot, Autozone, or Pepboys. This filled out my set nicely and gradually as I went along, which was much easier on the wallet.

Many specialty tools you will need for specific jobs are available at Autozone, Pepboys and similar stores through a loan program. You simply go in, look at the sheet of tools they offer and tell them the tool you need. You then put down a deposit on the tool (which is the price of the tool) and return it within the specified time for your money back. If you decide that you like the tool or will need the tool often enough to make it worth while you can simply keep it (the store is fine with this). I have gotten a number of my tools in this manner and have done so because many of the tools through this program are sold under the brand OEM. The stores offer OEM on the shelves, BUT if you get them through the loan program they are not only often a little cheaper, but they also often come with a clamshell case whereas the tools off the shelf come in those disposable cardboard and plastic packages. The clamshell goes a long way to protecting your tools from humidity etc.
Always open the case and inspect the tool in tho store and at the counter to make sure that all the parts are there and that there is no obvious damage.

Tools that I've gotten this way
Inch Pound torque wrench (it was brand new and had the clamshell).
Pitman puller
gear puller
Compression tester (brand new and had the clamshell)

When deciding to keep a tool I look at how often it will actually get used. I do some reconditioning of small engine items like pressure washers, lawnmowers, and generators as a side hustle, so the torque wrench, gear puller, and compression tester get used.

Always check the loan programs. Having the right tool for a job makes life so much easier.

1) the job goes faster
2) Your frustration levels will be much lower
3) You are MUCH less likely to break or screw something up resulting in further repairs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MeToo
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top