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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 16 y/o son just bought a 2007 Nissan Xterra a couple of days ago. He took it to Walmart for an oil change then went riding around town for maybe 30 minutes. As he gets closer to home he noticed a smoke coming from the hood and came straight home. We popped the hood and saw this...
Is it an easy fix? Expensive?
 

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To me, that looks like a tee that has been capped to become a straight pipe.

Consider removing the damaged tee and just put the existing hose onto the nipple that the tee came off of.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
To me, that looks like a tee that has been capped to become a straight pipe.

Consider removing the damaged tee and just put the existing hose onto the nipple that the tee came off of.
Found it. It’s called the Heater Hose Inlet. I was able to get the part and a friend was able to put it in for me. I added more coolant and drive it around a bit. The temperature gauge though took a long time to come up. The heat is not working though now and the service engine soon light is on now.
 

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Found it. It’s called the Heater Hose Inlet. I was able to get the part and a friend was able to put it in for me. I added more coolant and drive it around a bit. The temperature gauge though took a long time to come up. The heat is not working though now and the service engine soon light is on now.
You have to bleed the cooling system of any air, this is likely why the heat is not working, but more importantly I wouldn’t drive it until you bleed it properly because you could cause more damage by overheating it with air in the system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You have to bleed the cooling system of any air, this is likely why the heat is not working, but more importantly I wouldn’t drive it until you bleed it properly because you could cause more damage by overheating it with air in the system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you. I will google that now. Single mom here and after helping him buy this car (literally less than a week ago) I am trying to do as much as I can myself. So glad I found this forum!
 

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Thank you. I will google that now. Single mom here and after helping him buy this car (literally less than a week ago) I am trying to do as much as I can myself. So glad I found this forum!
let me find some pictures for you. Also there is a tool that should only run about 20 dollars or so that will really help with the bleeding process.
 

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let me find some pictures for you. Also there is a tool that should only run about 20 dollars or so that will really help with the bleeding process.
you don’t need to get this exact model, or get it from Amazon but this picture is just for reference of the tool itself. Many companies make it and they all serve the purpose


So when you pop the hood there will seemingly be 2 radiator caps, one on the radiator itself toward the front of the vehicle, and another on the passenger side of the engine bay on a plastic reservoir. This one is the one we need to fill (easier to keep full with the funnel above) while the engine is running. The object is to keep adding coolant and distilled water as the engine heats up and the air pockets in the system slowly work their way out. This could take as quick as 10 min and I’ve seen some take upwards closer to an hour. After the vehicle begins to warm up a bit get inside and turn the heat on full blast and check to see if the heat is kicking-out hot air. If yes this is a good sign, means that coolant is flowing through your heater hoses. As you are running the car with the cap open it will “burp” air bubbles, once it stops burping let it cool down a bit and put the cap back on . This should be it, and your vehicle should be air pocket free and heat should be working!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
let me find some pictures for you. Also there is a tool that should only run about 20 dollars or so that will really help with the bleeding process.
Wow that would be great. I’ll take any help and advice I can get! Really appreciate it!
 

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Missed that it's a 2007. You second gen guys... Are you sure there isn't a bleeder screw? The little cap on the top of the broken T appears to be a bleeder to me.

I'm sure if Blackberry is around he'll chime in.

I would definitely recommend getting a haynes manual if you plan to do a lot of your own work. They're generally a nice starting point for info.
You can find the link to your factory service manual here:

Which will give you all the info you need as well.

I would check to make sure the Radiator on your Xterra has been replaced. The Gen2 Xterras had a known problem that resulted in coolant mixing with the transmission fluid. This results in the death of the transmission. If it still has the original radiator I would recommend replacing it as soon as possible. This is a fairly simple procedure. Cost for the radiator itself should be between $115 and $200 for an aftermarket unit. I would look at RockAuto or Amazon Prime for the best deals. Koyorad is a a well known brand.
 

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There is actually an air bleed screw/bolt on the intake manifold. You simply remove the bolt and top off the radiator until you see that no more air is coming out the bleed hole.
Good to know, I didn’t see one on my gen 2 but I honestly didn’t look very hard. I know the one on the Gen 1 is smack you in the face obvious
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
you don’t need to get this exact model, or get it from Amazon but this picture is just for reference of the tool itself. Many companies make it and they all serve the purpose

View attachment 77887
So when you pop the hood there will seemingly be 2 radiator caps, one on the radiator itself toward the front of the vehicle, and another on the passenger side of the engine bay on a plastic reservoir. This one is the one we need to fill (easier to keep full with the funnel above) while the engine is running. The object is to keep adding coolant and distilled water as the engine heats up and the air pockets in the system slowly work their way out. This could take as quick as 10 min and I’ve seen some take upwards closer to an hour. After the vehicle begins to warm up a bit get inside and turn the heat on full blast and check to see if the heat is kicking-out hot air. If yes this is a good sign, means that coolant is flowing through your heater hoses. As you are running the car with the cap open it will “burp” air bubbles, once it stops burping let it cool down a bit and put the cap back on . This should be it, and your vehicle should be air pocket free and heat should be working!
So when I do this, I’ll be taking the caps off of both the radiator itself and the plastic reservoir? I’ll fill the reservoir and the air will bubble out of the actual radiator?
I just ordered the funnel kit, it will be here tomorrow. Really appreciate you taking the time to answer my questions!
 

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So when I do this, I’ll be taking the caps off of both the radiator itself and the plastic reservoir? I’ll fill the reservoir and the air will bubble out of the actual radiator?
I just ordered the funnel kit, it will be here tomorrow. Really appreciate you taking the time to answer my questions!
Don’t take off the one on the radiator itself, give me a few and I’ll run out to take pictures to show you, and I’ll look for the bleeder that @Satito mentioned earlier
 

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Ok, first pic you see the radiator up front and the one on the left of the picture (passenger side of the vehicle) is the one we need to work with…
second picture is how I bled out my system using the funnel. Also do not arbitrarily use the same color fittings you see here, each funnel manufacturer seems to use diff colors for different sizes.

 

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I couldn’t find a bleeder on the manifold that @Satito referenced, but that is not to say it isn’t there, I just didn’t find it. What I did is filled up the funnel until it was showing liquid at the bottom, and started the truck and let it run for a long time and checked the heat to see if the air was coming out hot, then let it run for another 15 minutes. During this time the liquid level in the funnel may rise and fall, if it falls low enough to where you can see straight down to the bottom of the reservoir add more coolant or distilled water.
 

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I am sure there are YouTube videos of this process, maybe not on an Xterra perse, but the process is more or less the same on most vehicles. If you watch the coolant in the funnel during this process you will see large air bubbles “glurp” up like at a water cooler when you get water out of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I am sure there are YouTube videos of this process, maybe not on an Xterra perse, but the process is more or less the same on most vehicles. If you watch the coolant in the funnel during this process you will see large air bubbles “glurp” up like at a water cooler when you get water out of them.
These help so much. Seeing the process gives me a better understanding. THANK YOU!! Amazon is delivering tomorrow so I will try then. Fingers crossed this fixes the issue : )
 
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